46. Seeing your own potential as a leader with Diane Brown

How might hopeful school leaders become the leader they want to be? Today I talk to elementary school principal Diane Brown about leadership in times of crisis. 

If you have been listening to the show for some time, you will recognize Diane from episode 31: Should I send my child to JK? Diane is my neighbour, but at this point she is much more than that: she is a friend, a role model, a celebrity figure in my 4 year old’s life, one of my dog’s favourite humans, and a mentor to me. In this show we actually talk quite a bit about mentorship and how important it is to be a mentor for others, and inspired by Brene Brown we talk about what needs to change about leadership to address the shifting educational landscape as well as different ways to hold power in schools.

Diane is a gift in my life and so I’m glad to share this conversation with you.

Things We Talked About in the Show:

How to review the podcast on Apple Podcasts App (see this link for the whole explanation from CHRISTIAN CAWLEY)

You may think that the way to review podcasts on iOS devices like the iPhone and iPad is via iTunes. In fact, you need to use the Podcasts app.

This has a purple icon and should be on the first or second screen of your iOS device. Open the app, find the search tool, and enter the name of the podcast you want to review.

You’ll see the podcast’s logo (as album art), so tap this, then Reviews > Write a Review. Enter your iTunes password when prompted, then leave a star rating, a review, and a title. Tap Send, and you’re done.

Before writing a review, it might be worth looking at other reviews from fellow listeners. This can be useful for finding well-regarded episodes of the podcast that you’ve missed so far.

(Beware expanding a previous review on the iPad, as there is no way to exit the view other than closing the Podcasts app and starting again.)

 

 

About the Author
Passionate and curious about technology, smiles, special education, differentiated instruction, forests, graphic novels, accessibility, anti-oppression, and warm beverages. Can often be found laughing with young people and improvising songs on the spot. @teach_tomorrow

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